Is One State Enough?

As the viability of the two-state solution decreases, calls to promote a bi-national state in the name of justice, morality and realism are on the rise.

Today's Ha'aretz featured an article by Israeli-Arab academic Asad Ghanem entitled 'One State is Enough' in which he calls for a bi-national state as the most viable solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It follows a recent debate between Ilan Pappe and Uri Avnery over the desirability of a two state solution.

In light of the current political stagnation, continued internecine violence in the PA and institutional weaknesses within the Israeli and Palestinian governments, the chances for achieving a two state solution, which is the premise of the political process, are becoming more remote.

As the viability of the two-state solution decreases, calls to promote a bi-national state in the name of justice, morality and realism are on the rise.

Coupled with this are increasing calls within Palestinian society to give up the demand for a Palestinian state alongside Israel and instead demand full equality on the basis of 'one man one vote' (See: Inversion towards the Occupation). This trend also reflects the perception that the Israeli 'occupation' serves Palestinian-Islamic interests and thus any progress towards ending Israeli occupation should be thwarted.

The combination of this trend with the absence of a political horizon may undermine the current international consensus over the principle of the two state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Currently, the protest against both the occupation and the absence of a political horizon is being manifested in actions such as the British academic boycott. However, the erosion of the two-state solution may ultimately cause this process to evolve into criticism of the existence of Israel as a Jewish State.

Sources

Asad Ghanem, Ha'aretz, 6/12/07; full article (Hebrew).

Uri Avnery and Ilan Pappe, Countercurrents, 6/11/07; full transcript.