2000 Camp David Summit

This term refers to permanent status negotiations held between Israel and the Palestinians with the meditation of US President Clinton, which did not mature into a signed agreement.

Definition

The term "2000 Camp David Summit" (7/00) refers to the Israeli-Palestinian conference sponsored by President Clinton, in which a Permanent Status Agreement between Israel and the Palestinians was discussed. The meeting ended without an agreement.

Background

According to the layout of the Declaration of Principles (9/93) and The Oslo Process, the Interim Period (5/94-5/99) began with the Gaza and Jericho agreement (5/94). By the end of the Interim Period, the sides were supposed to sign a Permanent Status Agreement. The negotiations on the Permanent Status Agreement (5/96) were halted due to the Palestinian terror offensive (2-3/96) and elections in Israel (5/96).

In the Sharm al-Sheikh Memorandum (9/99), it was agreed upon to arrive at a comprehensive agreement on Permanent Status (target date 9/00), whose principles were to be agreed upon in the Framework Agreement on Permanent Status (target date 2/00). In an attempt to arrive at this Framework Agreement, negotiations were conducted that did not reach a breakthrough until the summer of 2000.

In light of this, the Camp David Summit (7/11-26/00) was assembled. Three delegations participated in the summit - Israeli, headed by Prime Minister Ehud Barak; Palestinian, headed by PLO chairman Arafat; and American, lead by President Clinton. At the summit, Historic Issues were discussed for the first time, such as the division of Jerusalem and the sovereignty over Temple Mount. The 2000 Camp David Summit ended without agreement.

Additional Sources

  • On the 2000 Camp David Summit from Prime Minister's Ehud Barak point of view: Edelist Ran, Ehud Barak: Fighting the Demons, Or Yehuda: Kinneret, Yedioth Aharonoth, 2003, pp. 338-397.

  • On the talks from Shlomo Ben Ami's point of view, see: Ben Ami Shlomo, A Front without the Rearguard, Tel Aviv, Yedioth Aharonoth, 2004.

  • For the articles on 2000 Camp David Summit, see the following articles: Robert Malley, Hussein Aga, Dennis Ross, Ehud Barak and Gidi Grinstein in - New York Review of Books (the dates: 27/06/02, 13/06/02, 20/09/01, 9/8/01), http://www.nybooks.com/.

  • Rabinovich Itamar, Waging Peace, Or Yehuda: Dvir, 2004, pp. 137-139.

  • On the 2000 Camp David Summit from the point of view of Israeli government negotiation team manager, see: Gilad Sher, Beyond Reach, Tel Aviv, Yedioth Aharonoth, 2001.